Kevin Perrott sent me a link to the Technology Review's announcement that no one won the SENS Challenge by demonstrating that Aubrey de Gray's "Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence" proposals were so fantastic as to be unworthy of scientific discussion. (Granted, that's not a very high standard.)

In the end, the judges felt that no submission met the criterion of the challenge and disproved SENS, although they unanimously agreed that one submission, by Preston W. Estep and his colleagues, was the most eloquent. The judges also noted, however, that de Grey had not convincingly defended SENS and that many of his ideas seemed somewhat fanciful.

The judges of the challenge wrote:

SENS has many unsupported claims and is certainly not scientifically proven. I personally would be surprised if de Grey is correct in the majority of his claims. However, I don't think Estep et al. have proved that SENS is false; that would require more research. In some cases, SENS makes claims that run parallel to existing research (while being more sensational). Future investigation into those areas will almost certainly illuminate the controversy. Until that time, people like Estep et al. are free to doubt SENS. I share many of those doubts, but it would be overstating the case to assert that Estep et al. have proved their point.

Here's a press release by The Mprize in support of SENS.



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